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Title: Development of a 83 mKr source for the calibration of the CENNS-10 liquid argon detector
Abstract We report on the preparation of and calibration measurements with a 83 mKr source for the CENNS-10 liquid argon detector. 83 mKr atoms generated in the decay of a 83 Rb source were introduced into the detector via injection into the Ar circulation loop. Scintillation light arising from the 9.4 keV and 32.1 keV conversion electrons in the decay of 83 mKr in the detector volume were then observed. This calibration source allows the characterization of the low-energy response of the CENNS-10 detector and is applicable to other low-energy-threshold detectors. The energy resolution of the detector was measured to be 9% at the total 83 mKr decay energy of 41.5 keV. We performed an analysis to separately calibrate the detector using the two conversion electrons at 9.4 keV and 32.1 keV.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1913789
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10345694
Journal Name:
Journal of Instrumentation
Volume:
16
Issue:
04
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
P04002
ISSN:
1748-0221
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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Fig. 3(b) shows the tunneling probability T according to the Kane two-band model in the three materials, In0.53Ga0.47As, GaAs, and GaN, following our observation of a similar electroluminescence mechanism in GaN/AlN RTDs (due to strong polarization field of wurtzite structures) [8]. The expression is Tinter = (2/9)∙exp[(-2 ∙Ug 2 ∙me)/(2h∙P∙E)], where Ug is the bandgap energy, P is the valence-to-conduction-band momentum matrix element, and E is the electric field. Values for the highest calculated internal E fields for the InGaAs and GaN are also shown, indicating that Tinter in those structures approaches values of ~10-5. As shown, a GaAs RTD would require an internal field of ~6×105 V/cm, which is rarely realized in standard GaAs RTDs, perhaps explaining why there have been few if any reports of room-temperature electroluminescence in the GaAs devices. [1] E.R. Brown,et al., Appl. Phys. Lett., vol. 58, 2291, 1991. [5] S. Sze, Physics of Semiconductor Devices, 2nd Ed. 12.2.1 (Wiley, 1981). [2] M. Feiginov et al., Appl. Phys. Lett., 99, 233506, 2011. [6] L. Coldren, Diode Lasers and Photonic Integrated Circuits, (Wiley, 1995). [3] Y. Nishida et al., Nature Sci. Reports, 9, 18125, 2019. [7] E.O. Kane, J. of Appl. Phy 32, 83 (1961). [4] P. Fakhimi, et al., 2019 DRC Conference Digest. [8] T. Growden, et al., Nature Light: Science & Applications 7, 17150 (2018). [5] S. Sze, Physics of Semiconductor Devices, 2nd Ed. 12.2.1 (Wiley, 1981). [6] L. Coldren, Diode Lasers and Photonic Integrated Circuits, (Wiley, 1995). [7] E.O. Kane, J. of Appl. Phy 32, 83 (1961). [8] T. Growden, et al., Nature Light: Science & Applications 7, 17150 (2018).« less