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Title: Harnessing NEON to evaluate ecological tipping points: Opportunities, challenges, and approaches
Award ID(s):
1724433 1655121 1655183
NSF-PAR ID:
10346075
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Ecosphere
Volume:
13
Issue:
3
ISSN:
2150-8925
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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