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Title: ARENA: The Augmented Reality Edge Networking Architecture
Many have predicted the future of the Web to be the integration of Web content with the real-world through technologies such as Augmented Reality (AR). This has led to the rise of Extended Reality (XR) Web Browsers used to shorten the long AR application development and deployment cycle of native applications especially across different platforms. As XR Browsers mature, we face new challenges related to collaborative and multi-user applications that span users, devices, and machines. These collaborative XR applications require: (1) networking support for scaling to many users, (2) mechanisms for content access control and application isolation, and (3) the ability to host application logic near clients or data sources to reduce application latency. In this paper, we present the design and evaluation of the AR Edge Networking Architecture (ARENA) which is a platform that simplifies building and hosting collaborative XR applications on WebXR capable browsers. ARENA provides a number of critical components including: a hierarchical geospatial directory service that connects users to nearby servers and content, a token-based authentication system for controlling user access to content, and an application/service runtime supervisor that can dispatch programs across any network connected device. All of the content within ARENA exists as endpoints more » in a PubSub scene graph model that is synchronized across all users. We evaluate ARENA in terms of client performance as well as benchmark end-to-end response-time as load on the system scales. We show the ability to horizontally scale the system to Internet-scale with scenes containing hundreds of users and latencies on the order of tens of milliseconds. Finally, we highlight projects built using ARENA and showcase how our approach dramatically simplifies collaborative multi-user XR development compared to monolithic approaches. « less
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1956095
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10346516
Journal Name:
2021 IEEE International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality (ISMAR)
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
479 to 488
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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