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Title: SimSnap: Supporting Collaborative Learning through Reconfigurable Simulations
SimSnap responds to the need for a technology-based tool that supports learning at three social planes—individual, small group, and whole-class—while being easy to deploy with minimal technology overhead costs during their uptake. While much research has examined the efficacy of large-scale collaborative systems and individual-oriented learning systems, the intersection of and the movement between the three social planes is under explored. SimSnap is a cross-device, tablet-based platform that facilitates learning science concepts for middle school students through interactive simulations. Students in physical proximity can ‘snap’ their devices together to collaborate on learning activities. SimSnap enables real-time transition between individual and group activities in a classroom by offering reconfigurable simulations. SimSnap also provides an environment where open-ended and task-specific learning trajectories can be explored to maximize students’ learning potential. In this iteration of SimSnap, we have designed and implemented our first curriculum on SimSnap, focusing on plant biology, ecosystems, and genetics.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2010357
NSF-PAR ID:
10346682
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Editor(s):
Weinberger, A.; Chen, W.; Hernández-Leo, D.; & Chen, B.
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Computersupported collaborative learning
ISSN:
1573-4552
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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