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Title: ALMA and NOEMA constraints on synchrotron nebular emission from embryonic superluminous supernova remnants and radio–gamma-ray connection
ABSTRACT Fast-rotating pulsars and magnetars have been suggested as the central engines of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) and fast radio bursts, and this scenario naturally predicts non-thermal synchrotron emission from their nascent pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). We report results of high-frequency radio observations with ALMA and NOEMA for three SLSNe (SN 2015bn, SN 2016ard, and SN 2017egm), and present a detailed theoretical model to calculate non-thermal emission from PWNe with an age of ∼1−3 yr. We find that the ALMA data disfavours a PWN model motivated by the Crab nebula for SN 2015bn and SN 2017egm, and argue that this tension can be resolved if the nebular magnetization is very high or very low. Such models can be tested by future MeV–GeV gamma-ray telescopes such as AMEGO.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2108467 2108466 1908689 2224255 2221789 1944985 1909796
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10349769
Journal Name:
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Volume:
508
Issue:
1
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
44 to 51
ISSN:
0035-8711
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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