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Title: Dispersionless orbital excitations in (Li,Fe)OHFeSe superconductors
Abstract The superconducting critical temperature T c of intercalated iron-selenide superconductor (Li,Fe)OHFeSe (FeSe11111) can be increased to 42 from 8 K of bulk FeSe. It shows remarkably similar electronic properties as the high- T c monolayer FeSe and provides a bulk counterpart to investigate the origin of enhanced superconductivity. Unraveling the nature of excitations is crucial for understanding the pairing mechanism in high- T c iron selenides. Here we use resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) to investigate the excitations in FeSe11111. Our high-quality data exhibit several Raman-like excitations, which are dispersionless and isotropic in momentum transfer in both superconducting 28 K and 42 K samples. Using atomic multiplet calculations, we assign the low-energy ~0.3 and 0.7 eV Raman peaks as local e g  −  e g and e g  −  t 2 g orbital excitations. The intensity of these two features decreases with increasing temperature, suggesting a dominating contribution of the orbital fluctuations. Our results highlight the importance of the orbital degree of freedom for high- T c iron selenides.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2038011 2142801
NSF-PAR ID:
10349958
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
npj Quantum Materials
Volume:
7
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2397-4648
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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