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Title: Immunotherapy discovery on tumor organoid-on-a-chip platforms that recapitulate the tumor microenvironment
Award ID(s):
2122712 1953841 2052347
NSF-PAR ID:
10351199
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews
Volume:
187
Issue:
C
ISSN:
0169-409X
Page Range / eLocation ID:
114365
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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