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Title: Facile Synthesis and Integration of Poly(vinyl alcohol) Sponge-Supported Metal Nanocatalysts on a Microfluidic Chip Enable a New Continuous Flow Multireactor Nanocatalysis Platform for High Efficiency and Reusability Catalysis
Award ID(s):
2122712 1953841 2052347
NSF-PAR ID:
10351201
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering
Volume:
10
Issue:
32
ISSN:
2168-0485
Page Range / eLocation ID:
10579 to 10589
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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