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Title: Explanation and Facilitation Strategies Reduce Student Resistance to Active Learning
Active learning increases student learning, engagement, and interest in STEM and subsequently, the number and diversity of graduates. Yet, its adoption has been slow, partially due to instructors’ concerns about student resistance. Consequently, researchers proposed explanation and facilitation instructional strategies designed to reduce this resistance. Using surveys from 2-year and 4-year institutions including minority-serving institutions, we investigate the relationship between students’ affective and behavioral responses to active learning, instructors’ use of strategies, and active learning type. Analyses revealed low levels of student resistance and significant relationships between both explanation and facilitation strategy use and positive student responses.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1821488 1821092
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10351979
Journal Name:
College Teaching
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1 to 11
ISSN:
8756-7555
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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