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Title: STUDENTS WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES, PAIR PROGRAMMING AND SITUATIONAL MOTIVATION
Persons with learning disabilities (LD) are underrepresented in computer science and information technology fields despite the explosion of related career opportunities and interest. In this study, we examine the use of pair programming as a collaborative intervention in with computer programming and compare students with learning disabilities to students who do not have learning disabilities. We concentrate on situational motivation constructs which tap into the desire to meet goals and acquire skills. We find that students with LD and similar students without LD fare the same. For the both groups, three of the four situational motivation subscales increase after the introduction of pair programming. The use of pair programming holds promise as an educational intervention for all students including those with learning disabilities.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Editors:
SITE
Award ID(s):
1712251
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10354777
Journal Name:
Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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