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Title: All's fair in love and WAR: The conduct of wind acceptance research (WAR) in the United States and Canada
Award ID(s):
1934346 1934348
NSF-PAR ID:
10358060
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Energy Research & Social Science
Volume:
88
Issue:
C
ISSN:
2214-6296
Page Range / eLocation ID:
102514
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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