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This content will become publicly available on March 1, 2023

Title: Comparison between Core-collapse Supernova Nucleosynthesis and Meteoric Stardust Grains: Investigating Magnesium, Aluminium, and Chromium
Abstract Isotope variations of nucleosynthetic origin among solar system solid samples are well documented, yet the origin of these variations is still uncertain. The observed variability of 54 Cr among materials formed in different regions of the protoplanetary disk has been attributed to variable amounts of presolar, chromium-rich oxide (chromite) grains, which exist within the meteoritic stardust inventory and most likely originated from some type of supernova explosion. To investigate if core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) could be the site of origin of these grains, we analyze yields of CCSN models of stars with initial masses 15, 20, and 25 M ⊙ , and solar metallicity. We present an extensive abundance data set of the Cr, Mg, and Al isotopes as a function of enclosed mass. We find cases in which the explosive C ashes produce a composition in good agreement with the observed 54 Cr/ 52 Cr and 53 Cr/ 52 Cr ratios as well as the 50 Cr/ 52 Cr ratios. Taking into account that the signal at atomic mass 50 could also originate from 50 Ti, the ashes of explosive He burning also match the observed ratios. Addition of material from the He ashes (enriched in Al and Cr more » relative to Mg to simulate the make-up of chromite grains) to the solar system’s composition may reproduce the observed correlation between Mg and Cr anomalies, while material from the C ashes does not present significant Mg anomalies together with Cr isotopic variations. In all cases, nonradiogenic, stable Mg isotope variations dominate over the variations expected from 26 Al. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1927130
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10358256
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal
Volume:
927
Issue:
2
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
220
ISSN:
0004-637X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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