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Title: A Review of the 1948 Excavations of Griffin and Bullen at the Safety Harbor Site (8PI2), with Special Attention to Architectural Patterning
In 1948, John W. Griffin and Ripley P. Bullen conducted two weeks of excavations at the Safety Harbor site (8PI2) on Old Tampa Bay, the type site for the period and culture of the same name. Although they published a summary of these excavations (Griffin and Bullen 1950), many details were not included; for example, the report includes no plan drawings and artifacts are tabulated only in aggregate (by excavation block, rather than by square). Fortunately, the Florida Museum of Natural History curates relatively detailed notes and drawings of the excavations. We use GIS to review these for new insights, particularly regarding domestic architecture—a facet of Safety Harbor material culture that has remained particularly elusive.
Authors:
Award ID(s):
1821963
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10359372
Journal Name:
The Florida anthropologist
Volume:
75
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
3-31
ISSN:
0015-3893
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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