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Title: Modeling Dense Star Clusters in the Milky Way and beyond with the Cluster Monte Carlo Code
Abstract

We describe the public release of the Cluster Monte Carlo (CMC) code, a parallel, star-by-starN-body code for modeling dense star clusters.CMCtreats collisional stellar dynamics using Hénon’s method, where the cumulative effect of many two-body encounters is statistically reproduced as a single effective encounter between nearest-neighbor particles on a relaxation timescale. The star-by-star approach allows for the inclusion of additional physics, including strong gravitational three- and four-body encounters, two-body tidal and gravitational-wave captures, mass loss in arbitrary galactic tidal fields, and stellar evolution for both single and binary stars. The public release ofCMCis pinned directly to theCOSMICpopulation synthesis code, allowing dynamical star cluster simulations and population synthesis studies to be performed using identical assumptions about the stellar physics and initial conditions. As a demonstration, we present two examples of star cluster modeling: first, we perform the largest (N= 108) star-by-starN-body simulation of a Plummer sphere evolving to core collapse, reproducing the expected self-similar density profile over more than 15 orders of magnitude; second, we generate realistic models for typical globular clusters, and we show that their dynamical evolution can produce significant numbers of black hole mergers with masses greater than those produced from isolated binary evolution (such as GW190521, a more » recently reported merger with component masses in the pulsational pair-instability mass gap).

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Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2009916 2108624 2001751
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10361831
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series
Volume:
258
Issue:
2
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
Article No. 22
ISSN:
0067-0049
Publisher:
DOI PREFIX: 10.3847
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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