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Title: Structural and spectral properties of Galactic plane variable radio sources
ABSTRACT

In the time domain, the radio sky in particular along the Galactic plane direction may vary significantly because of various energetic activities associated with stars, stellar, and supermassive black holes. Multi-epoch Very Large Array surveys of the Galactic plane at 5.0 GHz enabled the finding of a catalogue of 39 variable radio sources in the flux density range 1–70 mJy. To probe their radio structures and spectra, we observed 17 sources with the very-long-baseline interferometric (VLBI) imaging technique and collected additional multifrequency data from the literature. We detected all of the sources at 5 GHz with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope, but only G23.6644–0.0372 with the European VLBI Network (EVN). Together with its decadal variability and multifrequency radio spectrum, we interpret it as an extragalactic peaked-spectrum source with a size of ≲10 pc. The remaining sources were resolved out by the long baselines of the EVN because of either strong scatter broadening at the Galactic latitude < 1° or intrinsically very extended structures on centi-arcsec scales. According to their spectral and structural properties, we find that the sample has a diverse nature. We notice two young H ii regions and spot a radio star and a candidate planetary nebula. The rest of the sources more » are very likely associated with radio active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Two of them also display arcsec-scale faint jet activity. The sample study indicates that AGNs are common place even among variable radio sources in the Galactic plane.

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Authors:
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Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10362248
Journal Name:
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Volume:
511
Issue:
1
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
p. 280-294
ISSN:
0035-8711
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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