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Title: Binding Interactions in Copper, Silver and Gold π‐Complexes
Abstract

The copper(I), silver(I), and gold(I) metals bind π‐ligands by σ‐bonding and π‐back bonding interactions. These interactions were investigated using bidentate ancillary ligands with electron donating and withdrawing substituents. The π‐ligands span from ethylene to larger terminal and internal alkenes and alkynes. Results of X‐ray crystallography, NMR, and IR spectroscopy and gas phase experiments show that the binding energies increase in the order Ag  more » « less

Award ID(s):
1954456
NSF-PAR ID:
10363515
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Chemistry – A European Journal
Volume:
28
Issue:
13
ISSN:
0947-6539
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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