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Title: Influence of nutrient supply on plankton microbiome biodiversity and distribution in a coastal upwelling region
Abstract

The ecological and oceanographic processes that drive the response of pelagic ocean microbiomes to environmental changes remain poorly understood, particularly in coastal upwelling ecosystems. Here we show that seasonal and interannual variability in coastal upwelling predicts pelagic ocean microbiome diversity and community structure in the Southern California Current region. Ribosomal RNA gene sequencing, targeting prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes, from samples collected seasonally during 2014-2020 indicate that nitracline depth is the most robust predictor of spatial microbial community structure and biodiversity in this region. Striking ecological changes occurred due to the transition from a warm anomaly during 2014-2016, characterized by intense stratification, to cooler conditions in 2017-2018, representative of more typical upwelling conditions, with photosynthetic eukaryotes, especially diatoms, changing most strongly. The regional slope of nitracline depth exerts strong control on the relative proportion of highly diverse offshore communities and low biodiversity, but highly productive nearshore communities.

 
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Award ID(s):
1637632
NSF-PAR ID:
10367337
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Nature Publishing Group
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Volume:
13
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2041-1723
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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    Location

    Global Ocean.

    Taxon

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    Methods

    Through a series of global model runs and data comparisons, we demonstrated the potential for regional studies to be extended to estimate global biogeographical patterns of diapause. We compared four modelling approaches each designed from a different perspective: life history, physiology, trait‐based community ecology, and empirical relationships. We compared the resulting biogeographical patterns and evaluated the model results against global measurements of copepodid diapause.

    Results

    Models were able to resolve more than just the latitudinal pattern of diapause (i.e. increased diapause prevalence near the poles), but to also pick up a diversity of regions where diapause occurs, such as coastal upwelling zones and seasonal seas. The life history model provided the best match to global observations. The predicted global biogeographical patterns, combined with carbon flux estimates, suggested a lower bound of 0.031–0.25 Pg C yr−1of downward flux associated with copepodid diapause.

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    Results indicated a promising path forward for representing a detailed biogeography of the marine lipidscape and its associated carbon flux in global ecosystem and climate models. While complex models may offer advantages in terms of reproducing details of community structure, simpler theoretically based models appeared to best reproduce broad‐scale biogeographical patterns and showed the best correlation with observed biogeographical patterns.

     
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