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Title: Colonizing the Caribbean: New geological data and an updated land‐vertebrate colonization record challenge the GAARlandia land‐bridge hypothesis
Authors:
 ;  ;
Award ID(s):
1932765
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10367644
Journal Name:
Journal of Biogeography
Volume:
48
Issue:
11
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
p. 2699-2707
ISSN:
0305-0270
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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