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This content will become publicly available on August 31, 2023

Title: A fast rising tidal disruption event from a candidate intermediate mass black hole
Massive black holes (BHs) at the centres of massive galaxies are ubiquitous. The population of BHs within dwarf galaxies, on the other hand, is evasive. Dwarf galaxies are thought to harbour BHs with proportionally small masses, including intermediate mass BHs, with masses 102
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1911206
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10367851
Journal Name:
ArXivorg
ISSN:
2331-8422
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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