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This content will become publicly available on July 11, 2023

Title: Impact of Haptic Cues and an Active Ankle Exoskeleton on Gait Characteristics
Objective

This study examined the interaction of gait-synchronized vibrotactile cues with an active ankle exoskeleton that provides plantarflexion assistance.

Background

An exoskeleton that augments gait may support collaboration through feedback to the user about the state of the exoskeleton or characteristics of the task.

Methods

Participants ( N = 16) were provided combinations of torque assistance and vibrotactile cues at pre-specified time points in late swing and early stance while walking on a self-paced treadmill. Participants were either given explicit instructions ( N = 8) or were allowed to freely interpret (N=8) how to coordinate with cues.

Results

For the free interpretation group, the data support an 8% increase in stride length and 14% increase in speed with exoskeleton torque across cue timing, as well as a 5% increase in stride length and 7% increase in speed with only vibrotactile cues. When given explicit instructions, participants modulated speed according to cue timing—increasing speed by 17% at cues in late swing and decreasing speed 11% at cues in early stance compared to no cue when exoskeleton torque was off. When torque was on, participants with explicit instructions had reduced changes in speed.

Conclusion

These findings support that the presence of torque mitigates how cues were used more » and highlights the importance of explicit instructions for haptic cuing. Interpreting cues while walking with an exoskeleton may increase cognitive load, influencing overall human-exoskeleton performance for novice users.

Application

Interactions between haptic feedback and exoskeleton use during gait can inform future feedback designs to support coordination between users and exoskeletons.

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Authors:
 ;  ;  ;  
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10368808
Journal Name:
Human Factors: The Journal of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
Article No. 001872082211136
ISSN:
0018-7208
Publisher:
SAGE Publications
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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