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Title: Fast extended depth of focus meta-optics for varifocal functionality

Extended depth of focus (EDOF) optics can enable lower complexity optical imaging systems when compared to active focusing solutions. With existing EDOF optics, however, it is difficult to achieve high resolution and high collection efficiency simultaneously. The subwavelength spacing of scatterers in a meta-optic enables the engineering of very steep phase gradients; thus, meta-optics can achieve both a large physical aperture and a high numerical aperture. Here, we demonstrate a fast(f/1.75)EDOF meta-optic operating at visible wavelengths, with an aperture of 2 mm and focal range from 3.5 mm to 14.5 mm (286 diopters to 69 diopters), which is a250×elongation of the depth of focus relative to a standard lens. Depth-independent performance is shown by imaging at a range of finite conjugates, with a minimum spatial resolution of9.84  μm(50.8 cycles/mm). We also demonstrate operation of a directly integrated EDOF meta-optic camera module to evaluate imaging at multiple object distances, a functionality which would otherwise require a varifocal lens.

 
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Award ID(s):
2127235
NSF-PAR ID:
10369465
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Optical Society of America
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Photonics Research
Volume:
10
Issue:
3
ISSN:
2327-9125
Page Range / eLocation ID:
Article No. 828
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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