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Title: Star Formation Suppression by Tidal Removal of Cold Molecular Gas from an Intermediate-redshift Massive Post-starburst Galaxy
Abstract

Observations and simulations have demonstrated that star formation in galaxies must be actively suppressed to prevent the formation of overly massive galaxies. Galactic outflows driven by stellar feedback or supermassive black hole accretion are often invoked to regulate the amount of cold molecular gas available for future star formation but may not be the only relevant quenching processes in all galaxies. We present the discovery of vast molecular tidal features extending up to 64 kpc outside of a massivez= 0.646 post-starburst galaxy that recently concluded its primary star-forming episode. The tidal tails contain (1.2 ± 0.1) × 1010Mof molecular gas, 47% ± 5% of the total cold gas reservoir of the system. Both the scale and magnitude of the molecular tidal features are unprecedented compared to all known nearby or high-redshift merging systems. We infer that the cold gas was stripped from the host galaxies during the merger, which is most likely responsible for triggering the initial burst phase and the subsequent suppression of star formation. While only a single example, this result shows that galaxy mergers can regulate the cold gas contents in distant galaxies by directly removing a large fraction of the molecular gas fuel, and plausibly more » suppress star formation directly, a qualitatively different physical mechanism than feedback-driven outflows.

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Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1907723 1907697
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10370339
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal Letters
Volume:
936
Issue:
1
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
Article No. L11
ISSN:
2041-8205
Publisher:
DOI PREFIX: 10.3847
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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