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Title: Observations and Simulations of Radio Emission and Magnetic Fields in Minkowski's Object
Abstract

We combine new data from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array with previous radio observations to create a more complete picture of the ongoing interactions between the radio jet from galaxy NGC 541 and the star-forming system known as Minkowski’s Object (MO). We then compare those observations with synthetic radio data generated from a new set of magnetohydrodynamic simulations of jet–cloud interactions specifically tailored to the parameters of MO. The combination of radio intensity, polarization, and spectral index measurements all convincingly support the interaction scenario and provide additional constraints on the local dynamical state of the intracluster medium and the time since the jet–cloud interaction first began. In particular, we show that only a simulation with a bent radio jet can reproduce the observations.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10370832
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal
Volume:
936
Issue:
2
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
Article No. 130
ISSN:
0004-637X
Publisher:
DOI PREFIX: 10.3847
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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