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Title: Protostellar and Protoplanetary Disk Masses in the Serpens Region
Abstract

We present the results from an Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) 1.3 mm continuum and12CO (J= 2 − 1) line survey spread over 10 deg2in the Serpens star-forming region of 320 young stellar objects, 302 of which are likely members of Serpens (16 Class I, 35 flat-spectrum, 235 Class II, and 16 Class III). From the continuum data, we derive disk dust masses and show that they systematically decline from Class I to flat-spectrum to Class II sources. Grouped by stellar evolutionary state, the disk mass distributions are similar to other young (<3 Myr) regions, indicating that the large-scale environment of a star-forming region does not strongly affect its overall disk dust mass properties. These comparisons between populations reinforce previous conclusions that disks in the Ophiuchus star-forming region have anomalously low masses at all evolutionary stages. Additionally, we find a single deeply embedded protostar that has not been documented elsewhere in the literature and, from the CO line data, 15 protostellar outflows, which we catalog here.

 
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Award ID(s):
1907486
NSF-PAR ID:
10373630
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
DOI PREFIX: 10.3847
Date Published:
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal
Volume:
938
Issue:
1
ISSN:
0004-637X
Format(s):
Medium: X Size: Article No. 55
Size(s):
Article No. 55
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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