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Title: A long evolutionary reach for fishing nets
Adaptive evolution is not just the stuff of geological history books—it is an ongoing process across ecosystems and can occur on a year-to-year time scale. However, in a world rapidly changing as the result of human activity, it can be challenging to differentiate which changes result from evolution rather than other mechanisms ( 1 ). On page 420 of this issue, Czorlich et al. ( 2 ) reveal a fascinating example that suggests that commercial fishing drove rapid evolutionary change in an Atlantic salmon population over the past 40 years. Their findings are surprising in two ways—that fishing for salmon drove evolution in the opposite direction from what one would typically expect, and that salmon evolution also was affected by fishing for other species in the ecosystem.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1743711
NSF-PAR ID:
10373843
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Science
Volume:
376
Issue:
6591
ISSN:
0036-8075
Page Range / eLocation ID:
344 to 345
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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