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Title: Resuscitation of the microbial seed bank alters plant‐soil interactions
Abstract

While microorganisms are recognized for driving belowground processes that influence the productivity and fitness of plant populations, the vast majority of bacteria and fungi in soil belong to a seed bank consisting of dormant individuals. However, plant performance may be affected by microbial dormancy through its effects on the activity, abundance, and diversity of soil microorganisms. To test how microbial seed banks influence plant‐soil interactions, we purified recombinant resuscitation promoting factor (Rpf), a bacterial protein that terminates dormancy. In a factorially designed experiment, we then applied the Rpf to soil containing field mustard (Brassicarapa), an agronomically important plant species. Plant biomass was ~33% lower in the Rpf treatment compared to plants grown with an unmanipulated microbial seed bank. In addition, Rpf reduced soil respiration, decreased bacterial abundance, and increased fungal abundance. These effects of Rpf on plant performance were accompanied by shifts in bacterial community composition, which may have diluted mutualists or resuscitated pathogens. Our findings suggest that changes in microbial seed banks may influence the magnitude and direction of plant‐soil feedbacks in ways that affect above‐ and belowground biodiversity and function.

 
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Award ID(s):
1934554
NSF-PAR ID:
10374821
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
Wiley-Blackwell
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Molecular Ecology
Volume:
30
Issue:
12
ISSN:
0962-1083
Page Range / eLocation ID:
p. 2905-2914
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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