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This content will become publicly available on August 14, 2023

Title: Algorithmic Fairness on Graphs: Methods and Trends
Graph is a ubiquitous type of data that appears in many real-world applications, including social network analysis, recommendations and financial security. Important as it is, decades of research have developed plentiful computational models to mine graphs. Despite its prosperity, concerns with respect to the potential algorithmic discrimination have been grown recently. Algorithmic fairness on graphs, which aims to mitigate bias introduced or amplified during the graph mining process, is an attractive yet challenging research topic. The first challenge corresponds to the theoretical challenge, where the non-IID nature of graph data may not only invalidate the basic assumption behind many existing studies in fair machine learning, but also introduce new fairness definition(s) based on the inter-correlation between nodes rather than the existing fairness definition(s) in fair machine learning. The second challenge regarding its algorithmic aspect aims to understand how to balance the trade-off between model accuracy and fairness. This tutorial aims to (1) comprehensively review the state-of-the-art techniques to enforce algorithmic fairness on graphs and (2) enlighten the open challenges and future directions. We believe this tutorial could benefit researchers and practitioners from the areas of data mining, artificial intelligence and social science.
Authors:
;
Award ID(s):
2134079 1939725 1947135
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10380840
Journal Name:
KDD
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
4798 to 4799
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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