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Title: Extreme Mass Loss in Low-mass Type Ib/c Supernova Progenitors
Abstract

Many core-collapse supernovae (SNe) with hydrogen-poor and low-mass ejecta, such as ultra-stripped SNe and type Ibn SNe, are observed to interact with dense circumstellar material (CSM). These events likely arise from the core collapse of helium stars that have been heavily stripped by a binary companion and have ejected significant mass during the last weeks to years of their lives. In helium star models run to days before core collapse we identify a range of helium core masses ≈2.5–3Mwhose envelopes expand substantially due to the helium shell burning while the core undergoes neon and oxygen burning. When modeled in binary systems, the rapid expansion of these helium stars induces extremely high rates of late-stage mass transfer (Ṁ102Myr1) beginning weeks to decades before core collapse. We consider two scenarios for producing CSM in these systems: either mass transfer remains stable and mass loss is driven from the system in the vicinity of the accreting companion, or mass transfer becomes unstable and causes a common envelope event (CEE) through which the helium envelope is unbound. The ensuing CSM properties are consistent with the CSM masses (∼10−2–1M) and radii (∼1013–1016cm) inferred for ultra-stripped SNe and several more » type Ibn SNe. Furthermore, systems that undergo a CEE could produce short-period neutron star binaries that merge in less than 100 Myr.

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Authors:
;
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10381328
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal Letters
Volume:
940
Issue:
1
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
Article No. L27
ISSN:
2041-8205
Publisher:
DOI PREFIX: 10.3847
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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