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Title: Teachers' Perceptions of Culturally Relevant Engineering Design: Reflections From Professional Development
This qualitative study explores teachers’ perceptions of culturally relevant engineering design (CRED) through professional development (PD) that is the first phase of Project ExCEED (Exploring Culturally Relevant Engineering Education Design). The data were collected from nine participants from three public schools in North Dakota. The findings shed light on participants’ understandings of CRED, Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), the engineering design cycle and determine how PD influences their views about CRED tasks. The findings suggest that the teachers perceive CRED tasks as authentic, sensitive to students’ needs, and modifiable to cross-curricular contents. The results of this study suggest that PD has a positive influence on participants’ culture-specific and engineering design knowledge, participants’ confidence with regards to implementing CRED and thinking beyond the classroom.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2010169
NSF-PAR ID:
10384721
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
2022 annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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