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Title: Professorial fit: perceptions of engineering postdoctoral scholars
Purpose This study aims to explore the perceptions of a diverse set of 16 engineering postdoctoral scholars regarding their fit for the professoriate. The professoriate speaks to the body of tenured/tenure-track faculty within higher education institutions. Design/methodology/approach An intrinsic case study design was conducted to provide an in-depth understanding of the factors influencing engineering postdoctoral scholars’ perceived professorial fit using person–job fit theory. Findings As a result of inductive and deductive data analyses techniques, four themes emerged: the professoriate is perceived as a calling for those who desire to teach and mentor the upcoming generation of engineers; research autonomy in the professoriate is highly attractive; the work demands of the professoriate are contrary to the work–life balance sought; and the professoriate appears daunting due to the competitive nature of the job market and the academic environment. Originality/value This study is critical for those invested in possessing a deeper understanding of the postdoctoral career stage, its relationship to the professoriate as a career choice and broadening participation in engineering academia.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1821008
NSF-PAR ID:
10388178
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Studies in Graduate and Postdoctoral Education
Volume:
13
Issue:
3
ISSN:
2398-4686
Page Range / eLocation ID:
266 to 280
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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