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Title: Jets from SANE super-Eddington accretion discs: morphology, spectra, and their potential as targets for ngEHT
ABSTRACT

We present general relativistic radiation magnetohydrodynamics (GRRMHD) simulations of super-Eddington accretion flows around supermassive black holes (SMBHs), which may apply to tidal disruption events (TDEs). We perform long duration ($t\ge 81,200\, GM/c^3$) simulations that achieve mass accretion rates ≳11 times the Eddington rate and produce thermal synchrotron spectra and images of their jets. Gas flowing beyond the funnel wall expands conically and drives a strong shock at the jet head while variable mass ejection and recollimation, along the jet axis, results in internal shocks and dissipation. Assuming the ion temperature (Ti) and electron temperature (Te) in the plasma are identical, the radio/submillimetre spectra peak at >100 GHz and the luminosity increases with BH spin, exceeding $\sim 10^{41} \, \rm {erg\, s^{-1}}$ in the brightest models. The emission is extremely sensitive to Ti/Te as some models show an order-of-magnitude decrease in the peak frequency and up to four orders-of-magnitude decline in their radio/submillimetre luminosity as Ti/Te approaches 20. Assuming a maximum VLBI baseline distance of 10 Gλ, 230 GHz images of Ti/Te = 1 models shows that the jet head may be bright enough for its motion to be captured with the EHT (ngEHT) at D ≲ 110 (180) Mpc at the 5σ significance level. Resolving emission from internal shocks requires D ≲ 45 Mpc for both the EHT or ngEHT.

 
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Award ID(s):
1816420
NSF-PAR ID:
10390214
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Oxford University Press
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Volume:
519
Issue:
2
ISSN:
0035-8711
Format(s):
Medium: X Size: p. 2812-2837
Size(s):
["p. 2812-2837"]
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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