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Title: Applications of CRISPR/Cas13-Based RNA Editing in Plants
The Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) system is widely used as a genome-editing tool in various organisms, including plants, to elucidate the fundamental understanding of gene function, disease diagnostics, and crop improvement. Among the CRISPR/Cas systems, Cas9 is one of the widely used nucleases for DNA modifications, but manipulation of RNA at the post-transcriptional level is limited. The recently identified type VI CRISPR/Cas systems provide a platform for precise RNA manipulation without permanent changes to the genome. Several studies reported efficient application of Cas13 in RNA studies, such as viral interference, RNA knockdown, and RNA detection in various organisms. Cas13 was also used to produce virus resistance in plants, as most plant viruses are RNA viruses. However, the application of CRISPR/Cas13 to studies of plant RNA biology is still in its infancy. This review discusses the current and prospective applications of CRISPR/Cas13-based RNA editing technologies in plants.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2132693 2141560 2029889 1758745
NSF-PAR ID:
10390260
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Cells
Volume:
11
Issue:
17
ISSN:
2073-4409
Page Range / eLocation ID:
2665
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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