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Title: Hybrid pulsar–magnetar model for FRB 20191221A
ABSTRACT

We show that the 216.8 ± 0.1 ms periodicity reported for the fast radio burst (FRB) 20191221A is very constraining for burst models. The high accuracy of burst periodicity (better than one part in 103), and the 2 per cent duty cycle (ratio of burst duration and interburst interval), suggest a pulsar-like rotating beam model for the observed activity; the radio waves are produced along open field lines within ∼107 cm of the neutron star surface, and the beam periodically sweeps across the observer as the star spins. According to this picture, FRB 20191221A is a factor ∼1012 scaled up version of galactic pulsars with one major difference, whereas pulsars convert rotational kinetic energy to EM waves and the outbursts of 20191221A require conversion of magnetic energy to radiation.

 
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Award ID(s):
2009619
NSF-PAR ID:
10392050
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Publisher / Repository:
Oxford University Press
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Volume:
519
Issue:
4
ISSN:
0035-8711
Format(s):
Medium: X Size: p. 5345-5351
Size(s):
["p. 5345-5351"]
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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