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Title: Host density has limited effects on pathogen invasion, disease‐induced declines and within‐host infection dynamics across a landscape of disease
Award ID(s):
2133401 2133399
NSF-PAR ID:
10401712
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of Animal Ecology
Volume:
91
Issue:
12
ISSN:
0021-8790
Page Range / eLocation ID:
2451 to 2464
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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