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Title: REFINING CERAMIC CHRONOLOGY AND EPICLASSIC REOCCUPATION AT LA VENTILLA, TEOTIHUACAN USING TRAPEZOIDAL BAYESIAN MODELING
Accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon (AMS 14C) dates ( n = 78) from human bone collagen were analyzed in the largest high-resolution chronology study to date at the ancient city of Teotihuacan in central Mexico (ca. AD 1–550). Samples originate from the residential neighborhood of La Ventilla, located in the heart of this major urban center. Here, a trapezoidal model using Bayesian statistics is built from 14C dates combined with data derived from the stylistic analysis of ceramics from burial contexts. Based on this model, we suggest possible refinements to Teotihuacan’s ceramic chronology, at least within the La Ventilla neighborhood. We also explore the abandonment and reoccupation of La Ventilla after the political collapse of Teotihuacan in the Metepec and Coyotlatelco phases. Findings suggest that these ceramic phases began earlier than is currently projected and that the well-documented abandonment period of La Ventilla may have occurred more abruptly than originally estimated.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1927690
NSF-PAR ID:
10405344
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Radiocarbon
ISSN:
0033-8222
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1 to 25
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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