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Title: MGEs as the MVPs of Partner Quality Variation in Legume-Rhizobium Symbiosis
ABSTRACT Despite decades of research, we are only just beginning to understand the forces maintaining variation in the nitrogen-fixing symbiosis between rhizobial bacteria and leguminous plants. In their recent work, Alexandra Weisberg and colleagues use genomics to document the breadth of mobile element diversity that carries the symbiosis genes of Bradyrhizobium in natural populations. Studying rhizobia from the perspective of their mobile genetic elements, which have their own transmission modes and fitness interests, reveals novel mechanisms for the generation and maintenance of diversity in natural populations of these ecologically and economically important mutualisms.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2022049
NSF-PAR ID:
10414712
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
mBio
Volume:
13
Issue:
4
ISSN:
2150-7511
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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