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Title: High school students’ data modeling practices and processes: From modeling unstructured data to evaluating automated decisions
It’s critical to foster artificial intelligence (AI) literacy for high school students, the first generation to grow up surrounded by AI, to understand working mechanism of data-driven AI technologies and critically evaluate automated decisions from predictive models. While efforts have been made to engage youth in understanding AI through developing machine learning models, few provided in-depth insights into the nuanced learning processes. In this study, we examined high school students’ data modeling practices and processes. Twenty-eight students developed machine learning models with text data for classifying negative and positive reviews of ice cream stores. We identified nine data modeling practices that describe students’ processes of model exploration, development, and testing and two themes about evaluating automated decisions from data technologies. The results provide implications for designing accessible data modeling experiences for students to understand data justice as well as the role and responsibility of data modelers in creating AI technologies.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1949110
NSF-PAR ID:
10416959
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Learning, Media and Technology
ISSN:
1743-9884
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1 to 19
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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  1. Abstract Practitioner notes

    What is already known about this topic

    Scholarly attention has turned to examining Artificial Intelligence (AI) literacy in K‐12 to help students understand the working mechanism of AI technologies and critically evaluate automated decisions made by computer models.

    While efforts have been made to engage students in understanding AI through building machine learning models with data, few of them go in‐depth into teaching and learning of feature engineering, a critical concept in modelling data.

    There is a need for research to examine students' data modelling processes, particularly in the little‐researched realm of unstructured data.

    What this paper adds

    Results show that students developed nuanced understandings of models learning patterns in data for automated decision making.

    Results demonstrate that students drew on prior experience and knowledge in creating features from unstructured data in the learning task of building text classification models.

    Students needed support in performing feature engineering practices, reasoning about noisy features and exploring features in rich social contexts that the data set is situated in.

    Implications for practice and/or policy

    It is important for schools to provide hands‐on model building experiences for students to understand and evaluate automated decisions from AI technologies.

    Students should be empowered to draw on their cultural and social backgrounds as they create models and evaluate data sources.

    To extend this work, educators should consider opportunities to integrate AI learning in other disciplinary subjects (ie, outside of computer science classes).

     
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