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Title: Decision-Making Approach to Urban Energy Retrofit—A Comprehensive Review
This research presents a comprehensive review of the research on smart urban energy retrofit decision-making. Based on the analysis of 91 journal articles over the past decade, the study identifies and discusses five key categories of approaches to retrofit decision-making, including simulation, optimization, assessment, system integration, and empirical study. While substantial advancements have been made in this field, opportunities for further growth remain. Findings suggest directions for future research and underscore the importance of interdisciplinary collaboration, data-driven evaluation methodologies, stakeholder engagement, system integration, and robust and adaptable retrofit solutions in the field of urban energy retrofitting. This review provides valuable insights for researchers, policymakers, and practitioners interested in advancing the state of the art in this critical area of research to facilitate more effective, sustainable, and efficient solutions for urban energy retrofits.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2046374
NSF-PAR ID:
10417443
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Buildings
Volume:
13
Issue:
6
ISSN:
2075-5309
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1425
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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