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Title: Groundwater Well Data from the Middle Rio Grande Valley Riparian Zone, New Mexico (1999-2014)
This study originated with the objective of parameterizing riparian evapotranspiration (ET) in the water budget of the middle Rio Grande of New Mexico.  We hypothesized that flooding and invasions of non-native species would impact the ecosystem's use of water.  Our objectives were to measure and compare the ET of native (Rio Grande cottonwood, Populus deltoides ssp. wizleni) and non-native (saltcedar, Tamarix chinensis, Russian olive, Eleagnus angustifolia) bosque (woodland) communities and to evaluate how water use is affected by climatic variability resulting in high river flows and flooding as well as drought conditions and deep water tables.  This data set contains water table levels monitored at nine sites along the Rio Grande riparian corridor between Albuquerque and Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge.  Data date to 1999.  Two sites remain active and are well into their second decade of monitoring.  One is in a xero-riparian, non-flooding, saltcedar woodland within the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge.  The other is in a dense, monotypic saltcedar thicket at the Bosque del Apache NWR that is subject to flood pulses associated with high river flows.    more » « less
Award ID(s):
1655499
NSF-PAR ID:
10424105
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Publisher / Repository:
Environmental Data Initiative
Date Published:
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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    Predicting the influence of climate change on riparian plant communities improves management strategies. The sensitivity of riparian vegetation to climate and other abiotic factors depends on interactions between properties of the ecosystem, like flood regime, and plant characteristics. To explore these interactions, we addressed three questions: (a) does the composition and diversity of riparian vegetation vary with the flood regime; (b) do abiotic correlates of vegetation, including climate and groundwater, differ between sites that flood compared to locations that did not experience floods; and (c) which plant functional groups account for differential plant community sensitivity to abiotic factors between flood regimes?

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