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Title: Data report: detailed lithologic columns for IODP Expedition 385 and DSDP Leg 64 sites in the Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California, Mexico
The Guaymas Basin, in the central Gulf of California, is a marginal ocean basin characterized by active seafloor spreading and high sedimentation rates. It has been the focus of two drilling expeditions, Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Leg 64 and International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 385. Expedition 385 recovered over 4 km of middle Pleistocene to Holocene core at eight drill sites, providing only simplistic stratigraphic columns that were broadly divided into as many as four lithostratigraphic subunits largely based on diagenetic modifications of sediments (authigenic carbonate and silica). For this study, shipboard sedimentologic descriptions of these subunits were used to create new, more detailed lithostratigraphic columns at an approximately decimeter (core) scale for correlation purposes and sedimentary interpretation. This was accomplished through examination of slabbed core images, visual core description sheets, and a shipboard lithologic database. The new columns provide more detailed downhole variability in lithology. The lithologic classification scheme for Expedition 385 was then integrated with that of sites previously drilled during Leg 64 to translate published visual core descriptions so as to uniformly generate comparable stratigraphic columns for both sets of drill holes. These newly compiled and tabulated data provide a more detailed picture of stratigraphic variation of lithology on a core by core basis across the basin.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1326927
NSF-PAR ID:
10424600
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition reports
Volume:
385
Issue:
202
ISSN:
2377-3189
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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The drill sites on the continental rise were in the path of numerous icebergs of various sizes that frequently forced us to pause drilling or leave the hole entirely as they approached the ship. The overall downtime caused by approaching icebergs was 50% of our time spent on site. 3. An unfortunate injury to a member of the ship's crew cut the expedition short by one week. Recovery of core on the continental rise at Sites U1532 and U1533 cannot be used to precisely indicate the position of ice or retreat of the ice sheet on the shelf. However, these sediments contained in the cores offer a range of clues about past WAIS extent and retreat. At Sites U1532 and U1533, coarse-grained sediments interpreted to be ice-rafted debris (IRD) were identified throughout all recovered time periods. A dominant feature of the cores is recorded by lithofacies cyclicity, which is interpreted to represent relatively warmer periods variably characterized by higher microfossil abundance, greater bioturbation, and higher counts of IRD alternating with colder periods characterized by dominantly gray laminated terrigenous muds. Initial comparison of these cycles to published records from the region suggests that the units interpreted as records of warmer time intervals in the core tie to interglacial periods and the units interpreted as deposits of colder periods tie to glacial periods. The cores from the two drill sites recovered sediments of purely terrigenous origin intercalated or mixed with pelagic or hemipelagic deposits. In particular, Site U1533, which is located near a deep-sea channel originating from the continental slope, contains graded sands and gravel transported downslope from the shelf to the abyssal plain. 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