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Title: Geometrically programmed self-limited assembly of tubules using DNA origami colloids
Self-assembly is one of the most promising strategies for making functional materials at the nanoscale, yet new design principles for making self-limiting architectures, rather than spatially unlimited periodic lattice structures, are needed. To address this challenge, we explore the tradeoffs between addressable assembly and self-closing assembly of a specific class of self-limiting structures: cylindrical tubules. We make triangular subunits using DNA origami that have specific, valence-limited interactions and designed binding angles, and we study their assembly into tubules that have a self-limited width that is much larger than the size of an individual subunit. In the simplest case, the tubules are assembled from a single component by geometrically programming the dihedral angles between neighboring subunits. We show that the tubules can reach many micrometers in length and that their average width can be prescribed through the dihedral angles. We find that there is a distribution in the width and the chirality of the tubules, which we rationalize by developing a model that considers the finite bending rigidity of the assembled structure as well as the mechanism of self-closure. Finally, we demonstrate that the distributions of tubules can be further sculpted by increasing the number of subunit species, thereby increasing the assembly complexity, and demonstrate that using two subunit species successfully reduces the number of available end states by half. These results help to shed light on the roles of assembly complexity and geometry in self-limited assembly and could be extended to other self-limiting architectures, such as shells, toroids, or triply periodic frameworks.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2011846
NSF-PAR ID:
10425697
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Volume:
119
Issue:
43
ISSN:
0027-8424
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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