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This content will become publicly available on June 7, 2024

Title: Technical Perspective: Revisiting Runtime Dynamic Optimization for Join Queries in Big Data Management Systems
Query optimization is the process of finding an efficient query execution plan for a given SQL query. The runtime difference between a good and a bad plan can be tremendous. For example, in the case of TPC-H query 5, a query with 5 joins, the difference between the best and the worst plan is more than 10,000×. Therefore, it is vital to avoid bad plans. The dominating factor which differentiates a good from a bad plan is their join order and whether this join order avoids large intermediate results.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1901379
NSF-PAR ID:
10430061
Author(s) / Creator(s):
Date Published:
Journal Name:
ACM SIGMOD Record
Volume:
52
Issue:
1
ISSN:
0163-5808
Page Range / eLocation ID:
103 to 103
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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