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Title: ACTS: Autonomous Cost-Efficient Task Orchestration for Serverless Analytics
Serverless computing has become increasingly popular for cloud applications, due to its compelling properties of high-level abstractions, lightweight runtime, high elasticity and pay-per-use billing. In this revolutionary computing paradigm shift, challenges arise when adapting data analytics applications to the serverless environment, due to the lack of support for efficient state sharing, which attract ever-growing research attention. In this paper, we aim to exploit the advantages of task level orchestration and fine-grained resource provisioning for data analytics on serverless platforms, with the hope of fulfilling the promise of serverless deployment to the maximum extent. To this end, we present ACTS, an autonomous cost-efficient task orchestration framework for serverless analytics. ACTS judiciously schedules and coordinates function tasks to mitigate cold-start latency and state sharing overhead. In addition, ACTS explores the optimization space of fine-grained workload distribution and function resource configuration for cost efficiency. We have deployed and implemented ACTS on AWS Lambda, evaluated with various data analytics workloads. Results from extensive experiments demonstrate that ACTS achieves up to 98% monetary cost reduction while maintaining superior job completion time performance, in comparison with the state-of-the-art baselines.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2019511
NSF-PAR ID:
10431836
Author(s) / Creator(s):
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of 31st IEEE/ACM International Symposium on Quality of Service (IWQoS 2023)
Volume:
1
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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