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This content will become publicly available on July 1, 2024

Title: Disrupt, Ally, Resist, Embrace (DARE): Action Items for Computational Social Scientists in a Changing World
In the past decade, a number of sophisticated AI-powered systems and tools have been developed and released to the scientific community and the public. These technical developments have occurred against a backdrop of political and social upheaval that is both magnifying and magnified by public health and macroeconomic crises. These technical and socio-political changes offer multiple lenses to contextualize (or distort) scientific reflexivity. Further, to computational social scientists who study computer-mediated human behavior, they have implications on what we study and how we study it. How should the ICWSM community engage with this changing world? Which disruptions should we embrace, and which ones should we resist? Whom do we ally with, and for what purpose? In this workshop co-located with ICWSM, we invited experience-based perspectives on these questions with the intent of drafting a collective research agenda for the computational social science community. We did so via the facilitation of collaborative position papers and the discussion of imminent challenges we face in the context of, for example, proprietary large language models, an increasingly unwieldy peer review process, and growing issues in data collection and access. This document presents a summary of the contributions and discussions in the workshop.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2145051
NSF-PAR ID:
10433213
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
ICWSM Workshop Proceedings
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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