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Title: Credibility in Private Set Membership
A private set membership (PSM) protocol allows a “receiver” to learn whether its input x is contained in a large database 𝖣𝖡 held by a “sender”. In this work, we define and construct credible private set membership (C-PSM) protocols: in addition to the conventional notions of privacy, C-PSM provides a soundness guarantee that it is hard for a sender (that does not know x) to convince the receiver that 𝑥∈𝖣𝖡. Furthermore, the communication complexity must be logarithmic in the size of 𝖣𝖡. We provide 2-round (i.e., round-optimal) C-PSM constructions based on standard assumptions: We present a black-box construction in the plain model based on DDH or LWE. Next, we consider protocols that support predicates f beyond string equality, i.e., the receiver can learn if there exists 𝑤∈𝖣𝖡 such that 𝑓(𝑥,𝑤)=1. We present two results with transparent setups: (1) A black-box protocol, based on DDH or LWE, for the class of NC1 functions f which are efficiently searchable. (2) An LWE-based construction for all bounded-depth circuits. The only non-black-box use of cryptography in this construction is through the bootstrapping procedure in fully homomorphic encryption. As an application, our protocols can be used to build enhanced round-optimal leaked password notification services, where unlike existing solutions, a dubious sender cannot fool a receiver into changing its password. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-31371-4_6  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2106263
NSF-PAR ID:
10434052
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ;
Editor(s):
Boldyreva, A.; Kolesnikov, V.
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Public-Key Cryptography (PKC 2023)
Volume:
13941
Page Range / eLocation ID:
159--189
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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