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Title: PAC-Bayes Compression Bounds So Tight That They Can Explain Generalization
While there has been progress in developing non-vacuous generalization bounds for deep neural networks, these bounds tend to be uninformative about why deep learning works. In this paper, we develop a compression approach based on quantizing neural network parameters in a linear subspace, profoundly improving on previous results to provide state-of-the-art generalization bounds on a variety of tasks, including transfer learning. We use these tight bounds to better understand the role of model size, equivariance, and the implicit biases of optimization, for generalization in deep learning. Notably, we find large models can be compressed to a much greater extent than previously known, encapsulating Occam’s razor.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1922658
NSF-PAR ID:
10438118
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
NeurIPS
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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