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Title: Rapid evolution during climate change: demographic and genetic constraints on adaptation to severe drought
Populations often vary in their evolutionary responses to a shared environmental perturbation. A key hurdle in building more predictive models of rapid evolution is understanding this variation—why do some populations and traits evolve while others do not? We combined long-term demographic and environmental data, estimates of quantitative genetic variance components, a resurrection experiment and individual-based evolutionary simulations to gain mechanistic insights into contrasting evolutionary responses to a severe multi-year drought. We examined five traits in two populations of a native California plant, Clarkia xantiana , at three time points over 7 years. Earlier flowering phenology evolved in only one of the two populations, though both populations experienced similar drought severity and demographic declines and were estimated to have considerable additive genetic variance for flowering phenology. Pairing demographic and experimental data with evolutionary simulations suggested that while seed banks in both populations likely constrained evolutionary responses, a stronger seed bank in the non-evolving population resulted in evolutionary stasis. Gene flow through time via germ banks may be an important, underappreciated control on rapid evolution in response to extreme environmental perturbations.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1754026
NSF-PAR ID:
10441314
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Volume:
290
Issue:
1998
ISSN:
0962-8452
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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