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This content will become publicly available on June 19, 2024

Title: From Child-Centered to Family-Centered Interaction Design
The goal of this workshop is to have interdisciplinary discussions on family-centered interaction design of technology as an extension to child-centered design. The workshop will discuss the potential benefits of a family-centered approach to design, as well as the challenges and open questions that designers may face when adopting this approach. Through discussions and interactive activities, participants will have the opportunity to discuss and share ideas on how to effectively incorporate a family-centered perspective into their own design processes. A family-centered approach to design has the potential to create more meaningful and contextual experiences for children and their families.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2202803
NSF-PAR ID:
10446680
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
IDC '23: Proceedings of the 22nd Annual ACM Interaction Design and Children Conference
Page Range / eLocation ID:
789 to 791
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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