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Title: Machine learning in/for blockchain: Future and challenges

Machine learning and blockchain are two of the most notable technologies of recent years. The first is the foundation of artificial intelligence and big data analysis, and the second has significantly disrupted the financial industry. Both technologies are data‐driven, and thus there are rapidly growing interests in integrating both for more secure and efficient data sharing and analysis. In this article, we review existing research on combining machine learning and blockchain technologies and demonstrate that they can collaborate efficiently and effectively. In the end, we point out some future directions and expect more research on deeper integration of these two promising technologies.

 
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Award ID(s):
1821183
NSF-PAR ID:
10447999
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Canadian Journal of Statistics
Volume:
49
Issue:
4
ISSN:
0319-5724
Page Range / eLocation ID:
p. 1364-1382
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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