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Title: Goose Bay (GBR) Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) High Frequency (HF) Radar Ground Scatter Data (1994-2002)
The Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) is an international network of ground-based, space weather radars which have operated continuously in the Arctic and Antarctic regions for more than 30 years. These high-frequency (HF) radars use over-the-horizon (OTH) radio wave propagation to detect ionospheric plasma structures across ranges of several thousand kilometers (km). As a byproduct of this technique, the transmitted radar signals frequently reflect from the Earth's surface and can be observed as ground backscatter echoes. The monthly files in this dataset contain maps of daily ground backscatter observations from the Goose Bay (GBR) SuperDARN HF radar binned onto an equal-area 24 km grid. The GBR radar is located in Labrador, Canada (53.32°N, 60.46°W) and is operated by Virginia Tech (Principal Investigator: J. Michael Ruohoniemi, mikeruo@vt.edu) with funding support from the National Science Foundation.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1836426
NSF-PAR ID:
10450549
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Publisher / Repository:
NSF Arctic Data Center
Date Published:
Subject(s) / Keyword(s):
["Arctic","Polar","Northern Hemisphere","Dopper Radar","SuperDARN"]
Format(s):
Medium: X Other: text/xml
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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